Sport Participation Legacy and the Olympic Games: The Case of Sydney 2000, London 2012, and Rio 2016

Reis, A. C., Frawley, S., Hodgetts, D., Thomson, A., & Hughes, K. (2017). Sport Participation Legacy and the Olympic Games: The Case of Sydney 2000, London 2012, and Rio 2016. Event Management, 21(2), 139–158. http://doi.org/10.3727/152599517X14878772869568

Sport participation as a legacy of the Olympic Games (OG) has frequently featured as a component of the “legacy package” that government bodies and organizing committees promote to the local communities to gain support for the hosting of these mega-events. However, only recently increased sport participation has been explicitly included as part of a legacy plan in OG candidature files. This article examines the changes and development of sport legacy planning and implementation from Sydney 2000, London 2012, and Rio 2016. The three case studies confirm that sport participation legacies are only achieved if host governments engage the community, develop long-term strategies, and coordinate efforts between different government portfolios and with a range of relevant stakeholders. So far, there is limited evidence available to demonstrate that relevant government bodies have attempted to strategically leverage the Games with the purpose of developing a sport participation legacy for the wider population.

Quantitative analysis of sport development event legacy: an examination of the Australian Surf Life Saving Championships

Hodgetts, D., & Duncan, M. J. (2015). Quantitative analysis of sport development event legacy: an examination of the Australian Surf Life Saving Championships. European Sport Management Quarterly, 1–17. doi:10.1080/16184742.2015.1021824

Please click here for a copy of the Author’s Accepted Manuscript.

Research question: This study explores whether the conduct of an unleveraged major event, the Australian Surf Life Saving Championships, leaves a legacy in terms of making a contribution towards the ongoing sport development of surf life-saving. This is an area of event legacy research that has received little empirical research.
Research methods: Secondary data sources from the event host organisation were used as indicators of sport development. Regression analysis, adjusting for changes in the outcome variable outside of the host location (Perth, Western Australia), was used to identify if hosting the event was associated with changes in indicators of attracting, retention and nurturing of sport members in the host location.
Results and findings: The only significant adjusted results were a decrease in membership for the host club and an increase in competitor numbers for Western Australia and the Perth metropolitan area, suggesting hosting the event offered some retention and nurturing opportunities for sport development.
Implications: This study contributes to sport event legacy literature through examining a non-mega, single sport event and its effects on sport development and suggests that hosting the event only had a limited effect on indicators of sport development. The study uses a regression analysis method that could be used to examine legacy from other events.

Sport mega-events and a legacy of increased mass participation in sport: reflecting on the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games

From the Oxford Brookes University 2012 – Legacies for Learning series

Hughes, K., & Hodgetts, D. (2014, May 11). Sport mega-events and a legacy of increased mass participation in sport: reflecting on the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games. Oxford Brookes University. Retrieved November 2, 2014, from https://radar.brookes.ac.uk/radar/items/abd4432c-d2d0-07e8-2da6-edf9a3740f41/1/ Continue reading Sport mega-events and a legacy of increased mass participation in sport: reflecting on the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games

Sport development legacies from major events: Legacy by osmosis?

This post is my presentation from the Sport Management Association of Australia and New Zealand (SMAANZ) 2013 Conference.

The post contains the abstract, presentation video and slides.

Hodgetts, D., Mummery, K., & Duncan, M. (2010). Sport development legacies from major events: Legacy by osmosis? Paper presented at the Sport Management Association of Australia New Zealand Conference, Wellington, New Zealand.

Continue reading Sport development legacies from major events: Legacy by osmosis?

Sydney 2000 Volunteers. A decade of wasted legacy?

Closing Ceremony:
Sydney 2000

This week saw the 10 year anniversary of the Opening Ceremony of the Sydney 200o Olympic Games. A commemorative ceremony was held at the Olympic Stadium. Volunteers were excited there was finally a (semi) valid reason to get their uniforms out of mothballs and don them once again. It’s no coincidence that Lord Coe and the London 2012 team are in Sydney, hoping to emulate the magic that the volunteers added to the games.

I was one of the 45,000-odd people who took some time off work and volunteered, carrying a placard in the opening and closing ceremonies and working with doping control during the Olympic and Paralympic Games. I knew it would be a once-in-a-lifetime experience. And it was. Continue reading Sydney 2000 Volunteers. A decade of wasted legacy?

PhD on Event Legacy: results from a preliminary study

Build it and they will come? An analysis of the impact of the Australian Surf Life Saving Championships in Scarborough, Western Australia on sport development (a research summary*)

It is commonly believed that major sporting events should provide ongoing benefits, including increased participation in the sport and physical activity in general. This is becoming an increasingly important aspect of hosting a major sporting event and it is commonly recommended that event organisers consider how a major event can benefit the development of the sport. In terms of providing ongoing legacies, it is not a case of “build it [an event] and they [legacies] will come”; a conscious, sustained effort is required in order to create a legacy that will benefit sport. Continue reading PhD on Event Legacy: results from a preliminary study

It’s in our hands: my World Cup legacy

There’s a small event on at the moment. It may have just brushed the realms of your outermost consciousness. It’s the FIFA World Cup.

My PhD research is in the area of event legacy – the impact and change that events have. My specific area is in community sport/sport development – so in this current example, will Football in South Africa be played more? Have better coaches/officials? More members and supporters?

Continue reading It’s in our hands: my World Cup legacy